Paris Series: From the Streets to the Show

New York in October 2013 experienced somewhat of an artist takeover in the streets when an anonymous artist, who goes by alias of 'Banksy', took the city by storm. His notoriously dark humored graffiti art had the entire city buzzing, and both new york locals and law enforcement were on the hunt to find his next target. Whether on the sides of buildings, free standing elements or even moving objects, Banky's specific stencil technique and style decorated and influenced not only New York, but the world. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prior to Banksy's New York takeover was a 1980s artist by the name of Keith Haring. Known for his graffiti art on subway ad banners, the cartoon style and ultimately his progression, Haring's art objective was the continuous line. He described his art as "fluid" and "flowing" on various occasions. Like Matisse, he never erased or corrected his art. However, his individual style appeared to have more conventional art-historical sources, including Haring’s interest in the early moderns and in Japanese calligraphy and sumi painting, as well as his youthful discovery of the work of Pierre Alechinsky. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This year at Deco Off and Maison&Objet, it was evident that both Banksy and Haring's influences had been brought to Paris. Graffiti street style art was prevalant among both the high-end interior lines to fashion seen walking the streets. The first glimpse we saw of this trend was at Kirkby Design by Jon Burgerman. This New York based company teamed up with British artist Jon Burgerman, known for his playful illustrative style. The 12 original styles these two entities created are brilliant and we especially loved how each fabric was merchandised. Just to emphasize that these textiles are pieces of art, they were each being 'poured' from paint buckets. This special touch was genius! 

 

 

 

 via jonburgerman.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                       via design-milk.com

 

 

 

Another favorite was Bull + Stein. This Brazilian-Germany company is best known for hand-blown glass and bronze apple-shaped sculptures. The most recent addition to the line is the graffiti fruit sculptures by Lisa Pappon. 

 

 

 

 via bullstein.com

 

 

 via bullstein.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Graffiti styles seen throughout our time in Paris include the following: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Share this post


Leave a comment